The Silence of Others

This film by Almudena Carracedo and Rober Bahar, produced by the Almodóvar brothers, screams out for justice for the unpunished crimes of the Franco régime

The Silence of Others recently presented at 22nd Ji.hlava IDFF and pocketed the Audience Award in the Panorama Dokumente section of the 68th Berlinale. The film was directed, produced and shot by the duo comprising Almudena Carracedo (Madrid, 1972) and Rober Bahar (Philadelphia, 1975), who also took care of the soundtrack, and who previously teamed up to helm the documentary Made in L.A. in 2007. The Silence of Others was executive-produced by El Deseo, the company run by Agustín and Pedro Almodóvar, flanked by Esther García, who never cease to support interesting, brave and daring productions, such as Zama, the latest movie by Argentinian filmmaker Lucrecia Martel.

As a matter of fact, it is in this very same South American country that part of the action unfolds in this documentary shot over a period of more than five years (racking up 450 hours of footage). It follows a quest for justice by the victims of the Franco regime, ranging from people who were tortured during the infamous dictator’s administration, to mothers of children who were stolen during that dark period in history and relatives who are still looking for the bodies of their missing loved ones, buried in ditches or mass graves somewhere. Indeed, those affected had to fly all the way to Buenos Aires to ensure that the global justice system would spring into action in this affair that part of Spanish society (and a great many of its politicians) refuses to accept, unwilling to look back. 

To continue reading the article go to Cineuropa.org. 





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F2.18DOK.REVUE
28. 10. 2018


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