Czech Joy

To introduce the cream of last year’s Czech documentary production

Traces, Fragments, Roots (Květa Přibylová, 2016)

This year’s Czech Joy competition section boasts of 13 titles with various politically and socially charged topics. 11 new Czech docs will see their premiere at the 20th Jihlava IDFF. The festival will be launched on Tuesday, Oct 25 with a unique premiere of Helena’s Law. The feature-length debut by documentarian and actress Petra Nesvačilová takes a sensitive look at the life of accused and sentenced gangsters of the ill-famed Berdych gang. In her film, Nesvačilová teams up with elite detective Helena Kahnová to uncover the overlooked human aspects of those who committed or were instrumental to crimes of various degrees.

Czech Joy will further present the new addition to the Czech Journal cycle entitled The Little Mole & Laozi by Filip Remunda. The film focuses on the visit of the Chinese President in the Czech Republic. Sequences showing Czech protesters are juxtaposed with those of enthusiastic greeters, interlaced with interviews with a Chinese dissident and a Czech teacher and accompanied by quotes by the mystic Laozi and footage of Leonid Brezhnev’s visit to Prague in 1978.

“Rather than in the protests, I was interested in the fact that the Chinese find funny that people here are allowed to protest publically. I decided to travel to China to get to the bottom of the issue,” says Remunda about his film.

Documentarian Pavel Jurda will introduce his feature-length debut My Name is Hungry Buffalo in which he joins a blind man who is also losing his hearing on his trip to the US to visit a shaman of the Navajo tribe hoping that he will restore Hungry Buffalo’s hearing ability. In her film Love Me, If You Can Dagmar Smržová follows the story of three handicapped men yearning for love life. The film offers a sensitive insight into the intimate life of people with disabilities.

Arms Ready (Barbora Chalupová, 2016)

War and military is the sole focus of Adéla Komrzý’s film from the Czech Journal series called Teaching War as well as Barbora Chalupová’s Arms Ready, which using home-made weapons ventures into experiments on the fringes of the law. The documentary essay genre will this year be represented with two films – Martin Ryšavý will introduce his Blind Gulliver where the excursions to Ukraine and Russia are framed by scenes showing the examination of the author’s eyes, and Květoslava Přibylová will present her visual poem on the relationship of men to nature called Traces, Fragments, Roots.

The Czech Joy section will further include films such as Czech Journal: Don’t Take My Life (Andrea Culková, 2016), FC Roma (Rozálie Kohoutová, Tomáš Bojar, 2016), The Way the President Departs (Pavel Kačírek, 2016), Love Me If You Can (Dagmar Smržová, 2016), Instructions for Use of Jiří Kolář (Roman Štětina, 2016) and Normal Autistic Film (Miroslav Janek, 2016).

Czech Joy is not only a prestigious selection of new Czech documentary films but also a showcase of the latest trends and various facets of Czech cinema.




F4.16DOK.REVUE
29. 10. 2016


from current issue:

New releaseShooting About KunderaDocumentarian Miloslav Šmídmajer describes the process of making a documentary about Milan Kundera with the working title “Milan Kundera: From the Joke to Insignificance.” Miloslav ŠmídmajerThemeNest in the bedroomPeter Hames, well-known British film historian and author of the book The Czechoslovak New Wave sent his remembrance to Karel Vachek to our magazine.Peter HamesThemeNever stop laughingPaolo Benzi, the Italian film producer and founder of the independent film production company Okta Film, describes for dok.revue how he met famous Czech documentary filmmaker Karel Vachek, who passed away last year. Paolo Benzi is also the main tutor of the Emerging producers in Ji.hlava IDFF.Paolo BenziThemeBehold, if the river is turbulent he is not frightenedIn this English issue of dok.revue we have collected some remembrances to Karel Vachek, the respected Czech documentarist who died in December 2020 at the age of 80. One of the contributors is Olaf Möller, a well-known film theorist and critic collaborating with many renowned film magazines (Film Comment or Sight & Sound), film museums and festivals (e.g. Il Cinema Ritrovato or International Film Festival Rotterdam).Olaf MöllerThemeEvery human being should get to wear comfy shoesThe Czech documentarist Karel Vachek was a chairperson of the jury at Yamagata international documentary film festival (YIDFF) in 2009. The board member of YIDFF and the former director of this festival, Asako Fujioka, has a remembrance of him smoking his pipe and going to the mountains with Japanese poet and filmmaker Yoshimasu Gozo to recite poetry to the skies.Asako FujiokaThemeLike the dog on the beach...American film historian Alice Lovejoy writes her remembrance of Karel Vachek, the remarkable Czech documentarist to whom we dedicate this English issue of dok.revue.Alice LovejoySportPandemic as an opportunityJi.hlava's Emerging Producers discuss the opportunity that can emerge from crisisSteve RickinsonInterviewThe times of lifelong careers are overAn interview with documentarian Jindřich Andrš, whose film A New Shift won the Czech competition section Czech Joy at Ji.hlava IDFF2020.Vojtěch KočárníkInterviewGoing to the Polish Turf with Our Own TeamInterview with documentary filmmakers Filip Remunda and Vít Klusák about their latest joint film project Once Upon a Time in Poland that shows how religion and faith are misused in contemporary Poland for mass manipulation and political purposes. The film‘s Czech premiere was held as part of the Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival 2020.Kamila BoháčkováIntroductionDok.revue 1.21This issue is dedicated to the doyen of Czech documentary filmmaking Karel VachekKamila Boháčková