Czech Joy

To introduce the cream of last year’s Czech documentary production

Traces, Fragments, Roots (Květa Přibylová, 2016)

This year’s Czech Joy competition section boasts of 13 titles with various politically and socially charged topics. 11 new Czech docs will see their premiere at the 20th Jihlava IDFF. The festival will be launched on Tuesday, Oct 25 with a unique premiere of Helena’s Law. The feature-length debut by documentarian and actress Petra Nesvačilová takes a sensitive look at the life of accused and sentenced gangsters of the ill-famed Berdych gang. In her film, Nesvačilová teams up with elite detective Helena Kahnová to uncover the overlooked human aspects of those who committed or were instrumental to crimes of various degrees.

Czech Joy will further present the new addition to the Czech Journal cycle entitled The Little Mole & Laozi by Filip Remunda. The film focuses on the visit of the Chinese President in the Czech Republic. Sequences showing Czech protesters are juxtaposed with those of enthusiastic greeters, interlaced with interviews with a Chinese dissident and a Czech teacher and accompanied by quotes by the mystic Laozi and footage of Leonid Brezhnev’s visit to Prague in 1978.

“Rather than in the protests, I was interested in the fact that the Chinese find funny that people here are allowed to protest publically. I decided to travel to China to get to the bottom of the issue,” says Remunda about his film.

Documentarian Pavel Jurda will introduce his feature-length debut My Name is Hungry Buffalo in which he joins a blind man who is also losing his hearing on his trip to the US to visit a shaman of the Navajo tribe hoping that he will restore Hungry Buffalo’s hearing ability. In her film Love Me, If You Can Dagmar Smržová follows the story of three handicapped men yearning for love life. The film offers a sensitive insight into the intimate life of people with disabilities.

Arms Ready (Barbora Chalupová, 2016)

War and military is the sole focus of Adéla Komrzý’s film from the Czech Journal series called Teaching War as well as Barbora Chalupová’s Arms Ready, which using home-made weapons ventures into experiments on the fringes of the law. The documentary essay genre will this year be represented with two films – Martin Ryšavý will introduce his Blind Gulliver where the excursions to Ukraine and Russia are framed by scenes showing the examination of the author’s eyes, and Květoslava Přibylová will present her visual poem on the relationship of men to nature called Traces, Fragments, Roots.

The Czech Joy section will further include films such as Czech Journal: Don’t Take My Life (Andrea Culková, 2016), FC Roma (Rozálie Kohoutová, Tomáš Bojar, 2016), The Way the President Departs (Pavel Kačírek, 2016), Love Me If You Can (Dagmar Smržová, 2016), Instructions for Use of Jiří Kolář (Roman Štětina, 2016) and Normal Autistic Film (Miroslav Janek, 2016).

Czech Joy is not only a prestigious selection of new Czech documentary films but also a showcase of the latest trends and various facets of Czech cinema.




F4.16DOK.REVUE
29. 10. 2016


from current issue:

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